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Grumpy Wookiee
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Post by Grumpy Wookiee »

Trying to ghost an image of a computer that I am using. It burns the first disk fine, and then recieves errors half way through the second. Anyone see this before? Also, once I get the ghost image burned, I load it in the computer that needs a new image. PC DOS starts. Do I have to use command line commands in order to find the ghosted image and get it to load?
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Post by BakerKlan »

GW,

We use Ghost extensively here where I work. As for the error, nope haven't seen it. We usually burn our image to a shared network resource. I'm assuming the PC you want to ghost is of the same architecture as the one you created the image on. If so, then allow the ghost boot disc to load and from there you should have a GUI interface that allows you to browse for the image.
When I die, I want to go peacefully like my Grandfather did, in his sleep -- not screaming, like the passengers in his car.

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Post by jhitesma »

Last time I used ghost DOS was the only option. Well, there was a version of windows out but no one actually used it for anything :D

Now I tend to just use a Linux boot CD and dd to do drive images.

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Post by Grumpy Wookiee »

jhitesma wrote:Last time I used ghost DOS was the only option. Well, there was a version of windows out but no one actually used it for anything :D

Now I tend to just use a Linux boot CD and dd to do drive images.
Thats a good idea, hadnt thought of that.

The computer I was trying to copy was not on a network, nor do I have a shared server that I can load the image on. I could have done a network copy using Ghost though, huh?

Anyways, I got it to work. The Ghost program was not working with the CD writer I had installed, so I switched it out and it worked fine.

What version of Linux boot CD do you use? I used to have one, but I lost it and forgot its name. Also, I am having problems burning a bootable ISO image, any experience? I have tried using Roxio and X-cd roast (alpha 0.98-15). No luck. I know I am doing something wrong.
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Post by jhitesma »

Grumpy Wookie wrote:
jhitesma wrote:Last time I used ghost DOS was the only option. Well, there was a version of windows out but no one actually used it for anything :D

Now I tend to just use a Linux boot CD and dd to do drive images.
Thats a good idea, hadnt thought of that.
Its not for people who don't have some background with Linux and Unix already - so I don't normally suggest it as an option.
The computer I was trying to copy was not on a network, nor do I have a shared server that I can load the image on. I could have done a network copy using Ghost though, huh?
A network or removeable HD always makes it easy. I saw a 320G USB2 drive at Sams club for $130 the other day. Think I'm going to have to go pick one up at that price!
http://www.samsclub.com/shopping/naviga ... tem=362125

I picked up one of the Linksys NSLU2 fileservers a year or so ago and after putting a version of linux on it I love it. Don't even have to think about it and it talks nicely with everything on my network with no effort. The 160G drive I have on it now is starting to fill up (Lots of photos tend to do that!) and I always like to replace drives with at least twice the capacity of what it was originally...if I can afford it. And at $130 how can I not afford it.

Anyways, I got it to work. The Ghost program was not working with the CD writer I had installed, so I switched it out and it worked fine.

What version of Linux boot CD do you use? I used to have one, but I lost it and forgot its name. Also, I am having problems burning a bootable ISO image, any experience? I have tried using Roxio and X-cd roast (alpha 0.98-15). No luck. I know I am doing something wrong.
I haven't used Roxio or X-cd but Nero came free with my last few drives and it's worked for me lately on that kind of thing.

I've used a variety of different boot CD's and usually just grab a fresh one when I need one. Right now I'm a huge fan of the Ubuntu boot since it also doubles as the install. I have a version installed on a 60Gb USB2 drive (powered off the port so no extra cables) I got cheap at walmart. I got it setup to where I can boot off the USB drive and keep the OS on there as well. Since Ubuntu does such a great job at hardware detection it's a VERY portable setup that has run on just about every PC I've tried it on lately. Just make sure you have a USB2 port on the computer - the one plain USB port I tried it on was painfull!

I also have a version installed on a USB thumbdrive the same way. Can boot directly off the thumb and have my full desktop right there how I left it. But - I don't like this because it does too many writes to the drive and that's not very flash friendly.

There's a link to a free burner package on the Ubuntu install page...may be worth trying:
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BurningIsoHowto

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Post by Grumpy Wookiee »

Thanks! Ubuntu was the name I was looking for, I just couldnt remember it. I remember that it was easy to use and very managable. I will look it up...

How do you get your computer to boot from an image on a USB port? I dont remember seeing that in the BIOS settings in the boot sequence options. Do you mind telling the world, or at least everyone on this board your secret? If not, could you PM me if you get the chance?

I do have Linux/Unix experience, although I would not call myself a master at it. I have worked with Red Hat, Fedora, Solaris, Mandrake, Austrumi, Knoppix, and Linspire. Right now, I am trying to rebuild a DoD training system that they have on DOS 3.3 with a Fedora Core 4 build. Its so much easier, and cheaper, then trying to use Microsoft products. Really cuts down the production costs.
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Post by jhitesma »

Grumpy Wookie wrote:Thanks! Ubuntu was the name I was looking for, I just couldnt remember it. I remember that it was easy to use and very managable. I will look it up...
It's very easy. In fact when Amy dropped her Apple notebook and broke the screen off I took some spare parts and made her a new computer - I started her with Mandrake Linux and she hated it. Didn't last more than a day or so. Switched her over to Debian and she was able to live with it...but wasn't happy. A few weeks ago I finally got around to switching her to Ubuntu and she loves it. So much quicker and easier to setup for me, easier to keep things up to date for her, and it's just plain friendly. She's even finally talking about getting rid of the broken mac now :D
How do you get your computer to boot from an image on a USB port? I dont remember seeing that in the BIOS settings in the boot sequence options. Do you mind telling the world, or at least everyone on this board your secret? If not, could you PM me if you get the chance?
It's not an image on the USB drive. I actually formatted the USB drive as a bootable drive and did some tricks to the Ubuntu image to get it to work. The easier method is to just simply install Ubuntu to the drive...but I seldom do things the easy way :D

If you have a newish computer (even my 3-4 year old motherboard was able to boot from USB) then booting from USB should be an option. If not there are still ways to pull it off. Here's some info from the Ubuntu site:
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BootFromUSB

And if you're really feeling up for it here's details on how to install a modified image of the CD to a USB device along with persistance so you can have an "install" thumb drive and still have a desktop that stays the same (as well as remembering your customizations and setups):
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LiveUsbPendrive ... sistent%29

I actually have one drive setup just for radio stuff this way. I have a bunch of dev tools and some special apps for doing SDR stuff as well as APRS. The persistance is nice...but still needed some work when I tried it with the Dapper Drake release. Not sure if Edgy Eft is better since I haven't tried it yet. The biggest problem I had with Drake was that printing was just plain broken. Otherwise it wasn't that bad.
I do have Linux/Unix experience, although I would not call myself a master at it. I have worked with Red Hat, Fedora, Solaris, Mandrake, Austrumi, Knoppix, and Linspire. Right now, I am trying to rebuild a DoD training system that they have on DOS 3.3 with a Fedora Core 4 build. Its so much easier, and cheaper, then trying to use Microsoft products. Really cuts down the production costs.
I've been playing with linux for a LONG time. I started with SLS back in the 0.8 days around 92 or so. No CD's then...just a big stack of 3.5" floppies. IIRC it was 12 for a base system but then another 15 or so if you wanted X.

And I downloaded all of them using an FTP to e-mail gateway since my only access to the internet back then was through the cleveland freenet with 9600 dialup. Took me close to a month to download it all! The FTP to e-mail gateway was slow...you'd send your FTP commands to it...then it would try to execute them. If you had a typo or directories had changed then you had to start over. Imagine a normal text based FTP where instead of a command line you had to e-mail each command!

Then - when you got it right and it sent you files it had to uuencode (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uuencode) them so they'd be e-mail safe (this was before MIME attachments)...and since there were strict limits on how big an e-mail message could be it then had to chop those files up into dozens of little files. So even once I got the file I wanted sent to me I still had to download a dozen small files, then combine them, then unencode them, and then find a way to get tar/gz working on dos :D

Of course about a week after I finally got it all downloaded the first release of slackware which was way more user friendly than SLS came out...and one of my friends came home from college with a full set of discs since he had gotten a job managing a Solaris lab and had nothing better to do with most of his time than download stuff!

So I've been a fan of linux for a LONG time. I even have a 3 ring binder that still has the old platypus logo on it from before the days of Tux. First page in that book says "As of March 17, 1993, the current version of Linux is 0.99 patchlevel 7".

Minimum configuration is listed as "386sz/16, 2mb ram, 1.44 or 1.2mb floppy, any supported video card (+ keyboards, monitors, and so on of course)" It then goes on to say if you want to do anything usefull you should have at least 5 to 10MB of drive space.

Also in that binder...DOSEMU manual for the "current" version 0.49 reelased May of 1993. "Improving the Security of your unix system" by David A Curry from SRI dated April 1990. And a bunch of stuff about term which is a whole other story :D


So now I feel spoiled by things like bootable USB drives :D

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Post by Grumpy Wookiee »

jhitesma wrote: So now I feel spoiled by things like bootable USB drives :D
Wow, ok, now I dont feel like as much of a techno geek. Your experience is much greater than mine, although I am attempting to fall into the category of full blown technogeek someday. My biggest problem is that once I get home, the last thing I want to do is touch a computer, so I never really play with Linux, I just use it at work a lot! Sure, I play around a little, but most of the time its just small stuff like changing the desktop look and feel and the welcome screen on XP. Just enough to throw people off and make them think that I know what I am doing.

I have worked with lots of guys that remember computers in the 70's and 80's (they were in the Navy and developed much of the building blocks for todays technology). Some of their stories sound very familiar to yours, when their 200mb hard drive was top of the line technology, and it was larger than todays laptops. :sick: I can only imagine.

Ok, so great, now I know who to contact when I have a computer related question. I am the system adminitrator for a facility on Camp Pendleton, and they always ask me how they can do this or do that. Now I know someone that might know, if I dont. Thanks
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Post by jhitesma »

Grumpy Wookie wrote:
jhitesma wrote: So now I feel spoiled by things like bootable USB drives :D
Wow, ok, now I dont feel like as much of a techno geek. Your experience is much greater than mine, although I am attempting to fall into the category of full blown technogeek someday. My biggest problem is that once I get home, the last thing I want to do is touch a computer, so I never really play with Linux, I just use it at work a lot! Sure, I play around a little, but most of the time its just small stuff like changing the desktop look and feel and the welcome screen on XP. Just enough to throw people off and make them think that I know what I am doing.
When I started with Linux you pretty much had to help build it to take part in it. I was still in high school and found my programming classes boring. Instead of buying a car I had just spent my savings on a top of the line 486 (I could have bought two and still had money in my pocket compared to what the school payed for 2 286's at almost the same time. Taught me a few things about government spending.)

By college I stuck with it because it was cheaper and easier than trying to do what I needed it to do under windows. This was 93-94 and while Linux had reached a point of being usable commercially. I had personally already setup a commercial client with a UUCP e-mail link already as a summer job and used Linux to host it all for them...They eventually upgraded to a 56k leased line in 96 and even hosted their own site on it.

I never pursued programming or computers - directly. But I always tried to involve them in things I did. I also included networking as my specialization as part of my degree - which ended up being controversial when the schools director retired. His replacement was more focused on photojournalism and IMHO was very shortsighted in regards to bringing "new media" into the program. But that's another long separate story!

The schools multimedia department was still teaching multiple slide projectors synched to soundtracks with some lights - no computers to be found.

They did have a web class, but they taught people to design in Photoshop then cut it up into image maps and not to bother with HTML!

There was also a CD-ROM class and admittedly they did keep up with the latest version of Director (6 at the time) and even let us get our feet wet with shockwave (brand new at the time.) But it was still taught with the idea of creating a CD based portfolio - basically still just a fancy slideshow. They encouraged using the built in functions and scripting everything VERY tight. I had already learned the inner language, Lingo, since I taught myself version 5 the previous summer...and 5 didn't have built in functions.

The prof hated that. He loved the functions since it meant he didn't have to keep messing with programming. He did notice that things were slower in 6 than in 5 when executing...but it didn't bother him since he loved not having to program. I never used the built ins. My projects were always smaller despite having more content and ran quicker and smoother than my classmates. He was amazed and loved it...but also annoyed because he couldn't follow how I was doing it.

Anyway the point is I had tried to keep programming in my education and it started well. But when a shift in power at the school happened that was no longer allowed and I was pressured to move towards journalism instead. Which I did NOT want. So frustrated with the system, feeling stuck since my motorcycle accident had cost me a year and slowed down the next year - I went for what I knew was going to have a future instead of what the school wanted me to focus on.

Can't say I've ever regretted it. Just sometimes wish the school would have "gotten it" as it did when I signed up.
I have worked with lots of guys that remember computers in the 70's and 80's (they were in the Navy and developed much of the building blocks for todays technology). Some of their stories sound very familiar to yours, when their 200mb hard drive was top of the line technology, and it was larger than todays laptops. :sick: I can only imagine.
Heck I just turned 32 this month - but when I first got introduced to computers as a kid in the late 80's thing were a LOT different. And even before that I had been introduced to radio and electronics which led nicely to computers.

I do remember my dad bringing home some old telletype machines that were coming out of service at his office. A friend wanted them to modify for RTTY on HF radio. They had still been in use just before he got them and were still freshly oiled and ready to go.

I met quite a few old timers who worked at NASA in Cleveland though radio. And one guy who was involved in the design of several early transistors for motorola. Those guys have some pretty good stories!

Ok, so great, now I know who to contact when I have a computer related question. I am the system adminitrator for a facility on Camp Pendleton, and they always ask me how they can do this or do that. Now I know someone that might know, if I dont. Thanks
No promises on their quality but I'm always willing to bounce ideas around. A couple of my friends work out at YPG in various capacities most dealing with computers and the various networks out there. Some interesting ideas have come up around our campfires :D

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